Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

Bitcoin is a consensus network that enables a new payment system and a completely digital money. It is the first decentralized peer-to-peer payment network that is powered by its users with no central authority or middlemen. From a user perspective, Bitcoin is pretty much like cash for the Internet. Bitcoin can also be seen as the most prominent triple entry bookkeeping system in existence. Who controls the Bitcoin network? Nobody owns the Bitcoin network much like no one owns the technology behind email. Bitcoin is controlled by all Bitcoin users around the world. While developers are improving the software, they can't force a change in the Bitcoin protocol because all users are free to choose what software and version they use. In order to stay compatible with each other, all users need to use software complying with the same rules. Bitcoin can only work correctly with a complete consensus among all users. Therefore, all users and developers have a strong incentive to protect this consensus.
From a user perspective, Bitcoin is nothing more than a mobile app or computer program that provides a personal Bitcoin wallet and allows a user to send and receive bitcoins with them. This is how Bitcoin works for most users. Behind the scenes, the Bitcoin network is sharing a public ledger called the "block chain". This ledger contains every transaction ever processed, allowing a user's computer to verify the validity of each transaction. The authenticity of each transaction is protected by digital signatures corresponding to the sending addresses, allowing all users to have full control over sending bitcoins from their own Bitcoin addresses. In addition, anyone can process transactions using the computing power of specialized hardware and earn a reward in bitcoins for this service. This is often called "mining". To learn more about Bitcoin, you can consult the dedicated page and the original paper. Is Bitcoin really used by people? Yes. There are a growing number of businesses and individuals using Bitcoin. This includes brick-and-mortar businesses like restaurants, apartments, and law firms, as well as popular online services such as Namecheap and Overstock.com. While Bitcoin remains a relatively new phenomenon, it is growing fast. As of May 2018, the total value of all existing bitcoins exceeded 100 billion US dollars, with millions of dollars worth of bitcoins exchanged daily.
The Bitcoin technology - the protocol and the cryptography - has a strong security track record, and the Bitcoin network is probably the biggest distributed computing project in the world. Bitcoin's most common vulnerability is in user error. Bitcoin wallet files that store the necessary private keys can be accidentally deleted, lost or stolen. This is pretty similar to physical cash stored in a digital form. Fortunately, users can employ sound security practices to protect their money or use service providers that offer good levels of security and insurance against theft or loss.
A Ponzi scheme is a fraudulent investment operation that pays returns to its investors from their own money, or the money paid by subsequent investors, instead of from profit earned by the individuals running the business. Ponzi schemes are designed to collapse at the expense of the last investors when there is not enough new participants. Bitcoin is a free software project with no central authority. Consequently, no one is in a position to make fraudulent representations about investment returns. Like other major currencies such as gold, United States dollar, euro, yen, etc. there is no guaranteed purchasing power and the exchange rate floats freely. This leads to volatility where owners of bitcoins can unpredictably make or lose money. Beyond speculation, Bitcoin is also a payment system with useful and competitive attributes that are being used by thousands of users and businesses.
Mining creates the equivalent of a competitive lottery that makes it very difficult for anyone to consecutively add new blocks of transactions into the block chain. This protects the neutrality of the network by preventing any individual from gaining the power to block certain transactions. This also prevents any individual from replacing parts of the block chain to roll back their own spends, which could be used to defraud other users. Mining makes it exponentially more difficult to reverse a past transaction by requiring the rewriting of all blocks that occurred after the target transaction.
Anybody can become a Bitcoin miner by running software with specialized hardware. Mining software listens for transactions broadcast through the peer-to-peer network and performs appropriate tasks to process and confirm these transactions. Bitcoin miners perform this work because they can earn transaction fees paid by users for faster transaction processing, and newly created bitcoins issued into existence according to a fixed formula. For new transactions to be confirmed, they need to be included in a block along with a mathematical proof of work. Such proofs are very hard to generate because there is no way to create them other than by trying billions of calculations per second. This requires miners to perform these calculations before their blocks are accepted by the network and before they are rewarded. As more people start to mine, the difficulty of finding valid blocks is automatically increased by the network to ensure that the average time to find a block remains equal to 10 minutes. As a result, mining is a very competitive business where no individual miner can control what is included in the block chain.
These abbreviations stand for the hashing power that your miner is generating. MH/s stands for megahash per second and GH/s stands for gigahash per second. There is a direct correlation between how fast your miner works and how profitable it will be.
W/Gh and W/Th are abbreviations for watts per gigahash and watts per terahash. These metrics calculate how many hashes a miner can run per watt of electricity. Mining hardware with lower W/Gh and W/Th are more efficient. Currently, the Antminer S7 and Avalon6 are the most efficient miners available for purchase, at 0.25 W/Gh and 0.29 W/Gh, respectively.
A mining pool is a group of miners who have shared their hashing resources to solve blocks together and the rewards are then distributed amongst the members. Let's say Bob runs a Bitcoin mining farm with 1% of the Bitcoin network hash rate. His machines only find, on average, one out of every 100 blocks. Bob becomes impatient and wants more frequent payouts. He joins a mining pool with 20% of the network hash rate. Instead of getting paid on average once per 100 blocks, Bob now receives smaller but more frequent payouts every five blocks.
We implement a world-class reputed Finance Department backed with a simple and easy way of making Transactions via various Payment Methods and we integrate fully encrypted API's in order to work on Business Operations quickly such as Investment and Pay-out when there is a need for our customers to activate their accounts and can cash their grown Profits in a very secured platform of Payment Processors which are stated below-
  1. Perfect Money
  2. Payeer
  3. Bitcoin/Bitcoin cash
  4. Advanced Cash (ADV)
  5. Local deposit/Bank wire
We will also further like to introduce a few more Payment Processors in order for our user flexibility and for a large options for making transactions more healthy. Probably we do predict some of the below listed Payment methods hopefully upcoming as per the server comfortability.
  • Dogecoin
  • Ripple
  • Litecoin